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Why is it important to mock test?

Why is it important to mock test?

Realistic mock testing is an important part of your preparation as a learner in order to pass the driving test. As an experienced ADI and a Diamond Advanced Driving test examiner, I can put you through a mock test that will feel real. It will last forty minutes, cover an actual driving test route and cover one manoeuvre and possibly an emergency stop.

Why is it important to mock test? Many pupils take their test too early and are not ready. For one thing it can save you allot of money – your test will cost £62 + cost of 2 hr slot! So rather than take a real test its much better to take some mock tests first! I guarantee that: if you can’t pass my mock test – then you won’t pass the real test!

Learning to drive in my 50’s

I only started to learn to drive in my 50’s and it didn’t come naturally to me. I had two instructors at first who were ok and took me to a certain level but it was when I started with Paul that I really began to make progress and reach test standard.

Rob 7 minors 05/08/17

Paul’s methods work

Paul’s methods work and he will get you through your test. I would highly recommend him if you are looking to pass your test, young or old.

A more confident driver

Become a safe confident driver

2017 results

Prices £££

My prices are straight-forward and upfront – no clever deals!

£51 for 2 hr lesson.
£150 for 6.0 hrs block booking.
£245 for 10.0 hrs block booking.

If you want FIRST CLASS tuition not second rate instruction – choose me!

CALL or Text  Paul Noble NOW on 0778 055 3078 or use the contact page

How to stop stalling!

Great results!

Learning to drive

Suffering from anxiety

Highly recommend

Learnt more in two hours

Read Danielle’s testimonial

Jack’s FIRST time pass!

For more testimonials and information

I’ve learned so much I love driving! Keys to passing your driving test Focused lessons     Results since April     A grade check test result     Intensive driving course   Paul improves your driver ability    Navy pupil passes first time    Zero minors    Intensive driving course     First time pass 1 minor!    The AA

 

 

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Use of Signals

Why do we use signals?

Q Why do we signal?
ATo let others know what we are about to do.

Q – Why do we check our mirrors before we signal?
A – To check it’s safe before we declare our intention to change direction.

Indicators

Q – What’s the problem with indicating too early on approach to a junction?
A – If there is a road to the left or right before the junction. It might confuse.

Q – What’s the problem with indicating too late (especially on roundabout?)
A –  Other road users don’t know where we are going!

Q – Are there any times you can think of where it may be unnecessary to signal?
A – When we are moving off – if there is nothing around at all.

Q- Why do we always mirror and signal when approaching a junction or pulling up on the left?
A – The car is moving so things can change quite quickly. Its a good habit to practice!

Therefore, signals should be timed, necessary and correct.

4 Main Signals

  1. Indicators (for an intended change of position).
  2. Brake lights (intending to slow down).
  3. Road position
  4. Speed

Q – When do we use road position as a signal?
A –  When turning left or right at a junction or any other circumstance where we want to signal a change of road position. Often used in conjunction with the indicators.

Q – Why are the brake lights an important signal?
A –  If we don’t use them (say just use engine braking), then other road users behind us won’t know we’re slowing down!

Q – How do I use speed as a signal?
A –  Speed as a signal can be used in quite subtle ways. For example: edging forward at a junction. However, this one has to be used with care. For example: pedestrians waiting to cross and I slow down; they ‘may’ get the signal to cross.

Testimonial  – Aaron passed FIRST time with 9 minors!

Aaron FIRST time 9 minors 3/5/17

Aaron says: “I couldn’t have asked for a better teacher than Paul.”

“He was patient and kind and made sure I always understood what he was teaching. I highly recommend him as a driving instructor!!!

Thank you Paul.

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Prices £££

My prices are straight-forward and upfront – no clever deals!

£51 for 2 hr lesson.
£150 for 6.0 hrs block booking.
£245 for 10.0 hrs block booking.

If you want FIRST CLASS tuition not second rate instruction – choose me!

CALL or Text  Paul Noble NOW on 0778 055 3078 or use the contact page

How to stop stalling!

Great results!

Learning to drive

Suffering from anxiety

Highly recommend

Learnt more in two hours

Read Danielle’s testimonial

Jack’s FIRST time pass!

For more testimonials and information

I’ve learned so much I love driving! Keys to passing your driving test Focused lessons     Results since April     A grade check test result     Intensive driving course   Paul improves your driver ability    Navy pupil passes first time    Zero minors    Intensive driving course     First time pass 1 minor!    The AA




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The left reverse

left reverseThe left reverse is probably the most tricky of all the manoeuvres – in fact most of us find it’s a bit of an art form! However, there is science to it and it can be broken down into five basic stages  with the advantage that it’s then much easier to understand and learn.

In it’s simplest form, it can be thought of as: a straight reverse towards the corner; a few left turns of the wheel; and then another straight reverse.

Basic Manoeuvre

What follows though, is a more detailed explanation (pictures coming soon)

1. Stop about two car lengths away from the corner you are about to reverse left into. (This is standard procedure on the driving test).

2. When ready, move off safely, passing the corner and stopping about two cars lengths past the corner.

HANDY TIP:  It is best to position the car a little further out from the kerb than normal as you are going to be reversing and want to make it easy for yourself! The front passenger door handle just off the kerb as viewed in the left mirror is a good positioning reference point

HANDY TIP: as you pass the corner try and gauge its shape and any potential obstacles around the corner. Keep your eye on the road ahead though!

3. Prepare the car for a straight reverse: With the handbrake on, select reverse gear and find the biting point. Check all round – including the blind spot – to check its safe before slowly moving off. Then, slowly reverse in a straight line towards the corner until the point at which you can no longer see the kerb out of the rear window. You are nearly there!

4. Continue to reverse for a few feet more until the kerb starts to move away as seen in the left mirror. This is the stage at which you introduce small amounts of left lock to follow the kerb. I’ll explain this in greater detail in the section on accuracy.

5. Then, as we follow the kerb there comes a point where it it’s time to straighten up – which again we will explain in greater detail in the section on accuracy. However, basically you can tell looking out the rear by the position of your rear windscreen wiper in relation to the centre of the road.   

6. Continue to reverse in a straight like at least two car lengths or, if there are hazard lines in the middle of the road, three hazard lines. Finish by making the car safe.

HANDY TIP: when you have completed the manoeuvre and are asked to move off do safely! Don’t rush!

HANDY TIP: be aware that roads are often wider at their end for some reason!

Three basic skills:

1. CONTROL: 

To execute this manoeuvre the car has to be kept at a slow but steady speed (less than 5mph) I call it granny walking speed! This requires good clutch control and is exactly the same control used in edging the car slowly forward towards a junction, so practicing a straight reverse first is a pre-requisite.

2. OBSERVATION:

This is key to this manoeuvre: as traffic can come from up to three directions as you reverse:- (a) from ahead; (b) from behind and (c) from the road you are reversing into.

Additionally, you have to be  careful to watch out for pedestrians and cyclists!

Let’s deal with each of the three scenarios

a) From ahead:

As you reverse towards the corner vehicles may come towards you from in front on the other side of the road. If the road is wide you may decide the risk is low and carry on. If you stop then you may wish to indicate.

b) From behind: 

as you reverse towards the corner vehicles may come towards you on your side of the road. You must stop as it is their right of way. You may wish to indicate left as with the reverse lights that will make it clear your intentions.

c) From behind when entering the corner: 

if you are in the process of turning into the corner and a vehicle comes from behind then you must give way, stop and probably pull forward back around the corner.

Additionally, if a vehicle turns into the road at the same time as you then you may wish to lower the risk by stopping.

Observation can be greatly improved in this manoeuvre with a method: with my pupils I use what I call the 360 degree method to ensure that ‘all around ‘ observation is maintained at all times while carrying out the manoeuvre:

  1. Look in the left mirror (this is the point you decide how much left turn)
  2. Look ahead.
  3. Look in right blind spot,
  4. Look behind and over left shoulder,
  5. Look behind and out of rear passenger window
  6. Back to start…..

HANDY TIP: try and judge where the kerb is using the rear passenger window. This is much easier for the taller of us. The benefit is that, because you can’t see the kerb you don’t tend to get too close to it!

HANDY TIP: Never reverse only using the centre mirror!

3. ACCURACY:

Now we come to the bit that most people find the most difficult. How do you follow that kerb without hitting it and either failing the test or damaging a tyre?

The basic method is:

As you check the left mirror as part of the 360 sequence and the kerb is moving away from you then add a small 1/4 of a left turn (from 12 o’clock to 9 c’clock. Note, unless its a really tight one, most corners will need only 3/4 of a left turn of the steering wheel. So, if you count you turn you will know when to straighten off!

Common problems:

  1. Don’t turn too early. Wait until you can see the kerb moving away in the left door mirror. Another problem, is sometimes corners start off shallow and then tighten up. If you put too much lock on too early in the turn then you can start to come too close to the kerb. If this happens don’t hit the kerb, so either stop or turn off the lock!
  2. Keep the car moving at a reasonable speed – granny walking speed. If the car goes too slow or too fast this can cause problems.
  3. Over use of the left mirror. This is fixed by the 360 method. Remember, the left mirror  has an inaccurate and restricted view. As its a convex mirror it makes the kerb look further away than it really is plus from a safety point of view you can see little else. Even if you can’t see the kerb out of the rear passenger window, if you use this you will begin to imagine where the kerb is!Tip: Don’t allow the kerb to leave the left mirror – you are too far out!

    Tip remember that if you successfully and safely complete the manoeuvre (even if badly) – you will pass your test!

    Tip : Watch where the bonnet is. If looking forward I want my bonnet to go left I turn the steering wheel to the right and visa versa.

CALL or Text  Paul Noble NOW on 0778 055 3078 or use the contact page

How to stop stalling!

Learning to drive

Suffering from anxiety

Highly recommend

Learnt more in two hours

 

For more testimonials and information

I’ve learned so much I love driving! Keys to passing your driving test Focused lessons     Results since April     A grade check test result     Intensive driving course   Paul improves your driver ability    Navy pupil passes first time    Zero minors    Intensive driving course     First time pass 1 minor!    The AA

 

 

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How to stop stalling!


Many pupils learning to drive for the first time, dread stalling the car! Maybe that’s why some pupils opt to learn on an automatic. There are some simple techniques though, which will help you avoid stalling.

What is stalling?

stallingFirstly, what do we mean by stalling? Simply put, this is when the engine stops running requiring a restart. That’s all very well, but most pupils want to know why and how can they stop it!

To understand why a car stalls though, we need to understand the role of the clutch in all this.

What does the clutch do?

Simply put, the clutch connects and disconnects the engine. Therefore, early on in the first driving-lessons, the pupil soon discovers ‘stalling’: when they forget to de-clutch or depress the clutch when braking to a halt. The stall happens because as the engine is still connected to the now stationary wheels via the clutch plates, the engine always loses the tug or war between them!

Hill starts

stallingAnother situation where a stall is more likely for the novice driver: is the hill start. This is because, a car moving up and away on a hill, requires more power and a good biting point (the point at which the clutch plates connect and the engine begins to be connected to the wheels). Therefore, if the pupil forgets to get a good biting point and put on the necessary extra gas and power, then the car is likely to roll backwards or stall!

Often though, pupils are caught out by the car simply stalling on a very slight incline. Many modern tuition vehicles with small petrol engines are very sensitive; if the pupil forgets to put a bit of gas on before releasing the clutch or brings the clutch up too fast with no gas at all – then the engine just can’t cope and stalls.

Don’t panic!

nervesAgain, stalling may simply take place because the pupil is  worried that they are going to stall! In other words, because they are nervous or apprehensive, they rush and bring the clutch up too fast – and of course they stall! (A bit of a negative feedback loop!)

Another effect, is what I call ‘kangarooing!’ This is when the car nearly stalls: jerking violently backwards and forwards. This effect happens because the pupil’s foot is moving up and down on the clutch pedal in response to the jerking motion.  The answer is to just de-clutch.

How to avoid stalling

To be honest though, one reason most pupils stall is that they don’t use the handbrake enough and ‘move off on the fly’ ( bringing the  clutch up slowly until the car begins to move).

If instead, you use the handbrake to find the biting point accurately, all you need to do to move off,  is release the handbrake and keep your clutch foot still until you are in motion. This is especially useful if you want to move off rapidly say at a busy roundabout because its more reliable and less prone to stalling.

What do I do when I stall?

Lastly though what do you do when you do stall? Firstly, its not the end of the world so don’t panic. Of course, make sure that the car has actually stalled: to do this look at the rev-counter. Is it on zero revs and is the red oil lamp on the dash board on? If so, then you have definitely stalled!

Secondly, make the car safe. In other words, engage the handbrake to stop rolling and restart the engine to restore power.

In conclusion then, to avoid stalling: plan and think about every move off by setting the appropriate gas and biting point and decide whether you are going to move off using the handbrake or on the fly.

Testimonial

Amber

Amber passed FIRST time 5 minors 16/06/16

Amber ( a trainee hairdresser) recently passed her driving test with me after around 50 hrs of tuition.

She had not had any previous lessons and passed first time with only 5 minors. This is what she had to say about my lessons:

“I did my lessons with Paul, would highly recommend. Doesn’t just stay local which gives a really good experience to driving different areas”

CALL or text  Paul Noble NOW on 0778 055 3078 or use the contact page

2016 results

Learning to drive

Suffering from anxiety

Highly recommend

Learnt more in two hours

Read Danielle’s testimonial

Jack’s FIRST time pass!

For more testimonials and information

I’ve learned so much I love driving! Keys to passing your driving test Focused lessons     Results since April     A grade check test result     Intensive driving course   Paul improves your driver ability    Navy pupil passes first time    Zero minors    Intensive driving course     First time pass 1 minor!    The AA

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Driver awareness!

awarenessWhat does being aware mean?

As driver is very important to be aware of what is going on around you: to perceive possible dangers and hazards and concentrate on the job in hand. You must be focused at all times. You must stay alert.

A driver uses all their senses including sight and sound.

Three good questions:

What do you see? What can you hear? How do you feel?

Why is it important to be aware?

Of course, if you are not aware of hazards and risks around you, then you are not only putting yourself at RISK but others also!

Who is responsible for risk on a driving lesson?

crashThe pupil is responsible plus the Driving Instructor shares that risk  and may intervene with questions or use the dual controls or steering if getting into danger.

How do mirrors help us with awareness?

side mirrorObviously it is important to be aware of hazards in front of the car but mirrors enable us to be aware of risks to the side of the vehicle and behind.

How do road signs and road markings helps with awareness

Unknown-1Spotting road signs and road markings early enable us to plan well ahead and deal with fixed hazards.  In addition, we need to make sure we are aware of traffic lights and signal changes..

Where should we be looking? Far distance, middle distance and near. Scan and plan!

How does the way your feel effect awareness?

Texting_while_at_the_wheel_(4351110509)-1Tiredness, dehydration, medication, anxiety, nerves and stressed! These all negatively effect awareness and ability to drive.

In addition, anger/road rage/ impatience can seriously effect judgment.     DONT’  use your mobile phone or drink drive!

Be careful of DISTRACTIONSchildren, CD player, Radio. Drivers behind you!

stay focused

How do you feel while driving?

Red – stressed find a place to stop; Amber – learning; Green – relaxed.

Are you aware of your speed and gears?

speedometerHow does speed effect your awareness?  Are you aware of the speed limits and your own speed?

Gears can be a big distraction on approach to roundabouts. Remember it’s “brakes to slow; gears to go”. Use block changing.

Are you spatially aware of the safety bubble around the vehicle?

Are you spatially aware?  Your position on the road.

How can you increase you awareness?

Talk to yourself; tell yourself what you are about to do. Reticular activating system.

Use commentary driving where you describe your observations and actions – but be careful that your don’t get distracted!

For lessons CALL or text  NOW on 0778 055 3078

or use the contact page

Navy pupil passes first time

Zero minors

Intensive driving course

First time pass 1 minor!

The AA

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